If we look away from the daily life to the nature landscapes, we will be able to see, how they have also been influenced by humans.

 

There are no truly virgin landscapes in Germany nor in Poland anymore. Even in the deepest forests and on the green overgrown riverbanks – man has left his footprints everywhere, fulfilling his basic needs: food, shelter or clothing.


Once, only a few people had the privilege to shape the land not for agricultural, but only for ornamental purposes.

At first, in the Baroque era, garden-art was limited by the strict laws of  geometry, symmetry and colour harmony. Then, in the 19th Century, it was set free from those restrictions, to expose native dynamics of nature, complemented by the play of the viewing axes.
   
The most famous representative of the German school of the classicist garden-architecture was Peter Joseph Lenné, who had numerous followers. Many parks and gardens from the area of the „Euroregion Pomerania Project” were designed by Lenné-himself, or by them.
 
Over the years a large number of those parks and gardens had lost their original appearance – at that time regional development policy had other, more important priorities. In effect, Mother Nature took those places back – garden ponds, paths and alleys grew wild with young trees and bushes, fountains and sculptures dissappeared in the green.

 

The following Polish-German project is a part of  the INTERREG IV A Programme. Its goal is the thorough analysis and popularization of the subject. In the first step, the project aims to improve the condition of the three selected gardens, which in effect will help create a social network of experts and other involved parties.

 

 

Example of baroque-style garden art

Example of baroque-style garden art

 

Modern garden with a central axis

Modern garden with a central axis